Assessment of the biodiversity, economic and productivity gains from exclusion fencing (WA)

Summary

Rangelands account for over three quarters of the Australian landmass. They are biologically diverse and economically important. However, livestock production in the rangelands faces several significant challenges.  

The current situation in the southern rangelands of Western Australia is representative of issues in small stock production rangelands across Australia. The presence of wild dogs and artificially enhanced populations of native and introduced herbivores act to limit production and enterprise choice.  

This is of particular concern in the southern rangeland of WA where there are few other enterprise choices other than small stock. Landholders are currently investigating and implementing options to allow them to develop sustainable enterprises. These include: wild dog fencing from paddock (~20,000ha) to large cell (88,000km2) scale; manipulation of water availability to direct stock; and implementation of established and new pest control measures at landscape-scale.  

This project first aims to understand the relationships between active predator management, cell-fencing and water availability on native herbivores, introduced herbivores and introduced predators.  

Second , it aims to assist landholders by assessing viability of increasing small stock production through manipulating predation and herbivores using active predator control, fencing and water availability. To address these aims the project will determine changes in density of introduced predators (primarily wild dogs and cats), native and introduced herbivores in response to fencing, predator densities and water availability. It will also identify how changes in predator and herbivore density in can be practically utilised by landholders to improve small stock production and native biodiversity 

Status

Commenced

Objectives

  1. To understand the relationships between active predator management, cell-fencing and water availability on native herbivores, introduced herbivores and introduced predators.  
  2. To assist landholders by assessing the viability of manipulating predation and herbivore numbers using active control, fencing and water availability for increases in stock production and biodiversity. 

To address these aims the project will determine changes in density of introduced predators, small stock, native and introduced herbivores in response to fencing, predator management and water availability. It will also assess the economic implications of these landscape-scale management approaches on the economic viability of individual livestock production enterprises..

Project Leader



Dr Malcolm Kennedy
Project Team
  • Dr Malcolm Kennedy, WA DPIRD 
  • Assoc. Prof. Trish Fleming, Murdoch University 
  • Dr Manda Page, WA DBCA 
  • Dr Joe Scanlan, QDAF
Project Partners
  • Western Australia Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (WA DPIRD) 
  • Western Australia Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (WA DBCA)
  • Murdoch University
  • Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA)

 

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